HOME     SUBSCRIBE     ADVERTISING     CONTACT US   
Magazine
Magazine     Articles     Blogs     Events     Clubs & Resources
by Romy Wasserman
 

Migration is a complex and dynamic part of life. It presents some of the greatest challenges and the most fulfilling rewards a person can face.

In Australia, international migration has played an important role in the history of the nation as well as its social, cultural and economic make-up. This is highlighted by statistics that show half the Australian population at any one time are migrants or the child of migrants. Unsurprisingly given this context there is a notable amount of research on immigration to Australia looking in depth at the phenomena and a range of related issues. What is perhaps surprising is that in all this research the South African migrants' story has largely been left untold.

Yet this migration is important. The number of South Africans moving to Australia has shown consistent growth over the last few decades. This growing population of South Africans in Australia is significant for both the sending and receiving countries and it stands to reason that this migrant group should be better understood.

This is one reason why I have chosen to do a PhD on migration between South Africa and Australia. Another reason is that as a migrant myself I am fascinated by the process.

My name is Romy Wasserman and I am a postgraduate student at the University of Adelaide. I am currently undertaking research into migration between South Africa and Australia. In particular my project looks at migrants' motivations, settlement experiences and feelings about citizenship and identity. Part of the data collection for this study is by way of an online survey I have designed.

If you are a South African migrant living in Australia please help me to learn more about these issues by filling out a survey here or at the link below. Both permanent and temporary migrants are eligible to participate. Your participation is anonymous; you will not be identifiable by your responses.

My aim is to collect 400+ surveys and capture as diverse a range of views and experiences as I can. Please do not underestimate the importance of your contribution. Your input will go a long way to helping us understand migration and the experiences of South African migrants to Australia in particular.

CLICK HERE TO COMPLETE THE SOUTH AFRICAN MIGRANT SURVEY

Thank you for taking the time to fill out a survey and don't forget to forward this link to other South Africans who might like to contribute to the study!

Any questions about this research are welcome and should be emailed to romy.wasserman@adelaide.edu.au

Sources: Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and Department of Immigration and Citizenship (DIAC)

 
 
 
Posted in migration |
Posted by Romy Wasserman
30 Sep 2011
Comments
I'm PROPHET OKIJO from Nigeria am 63 years old with 4 children graduated from the mental universe of Indian plant 1981st Was i bought my mental powers and particularism worries me is the mental powers, I help people to solve problems around the world to achieve their goals and dreams in the world, I have another temple, and they are located in India, Ghana, Israel, the Philistines , I am currently in Nigeria was my first temple is because, in case you want to reach me, it is my home address PROPHET OKIJO way Lugard str. Lagos State of Nigeria, or you want to contact me through my personal email (prophetokijofiretemple@gmail.com) Notice that if you have been searching for any kind of spiritual help, for example. Making quick money, promotion of employment, political forces, plant care, looking for children, supernatural powers and more (your destiny lies in your hand) to watch you at the welcome ..... 1.Ritual (making quick money)? 2.Join the new world Order (ILLUMINATI) 3.You wish handsome boy or girl of your dreams you find him or her? 4.ex back (his beloved escaped from you)? 5.Herbal care? 6.need their money back? 7.looking For children? 8.spiritual problem? 9.political powers? 10.need protection? Email: prophetokijofiretemple@gmail.com
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by PROPHET OKIJO on 18 Jul 2014

 
whats happening
Rating: 4 / 5
 
by josh on 24 Jun 2014

 
yolande wow were you born like that or? you take dumb to another level
Rating: 4 / 5
 
by Meagan on 23 Jun 2014

 
Being engaged to an Afrikaner girl in Australia was a horrible experience. First she rushed me into the engagement and threatened to leave many times. She described (in her own words) that Afrikaners, particularly Dutch Afrikaners were "all about business". She explained to me in detail that Afrikaners were impatient people who needed to be in control at all times and that it would potentially result in frequent arguments. Being naive at the time I accepted her observations on what she called "the south African way" and i tried to go along with them. However soon i also found out that many Afrikaner women are "tomboys" who love the company of men. So much so, that they are willing to engage in sexual acts with male friends. Since I was already engaged at this stage she told me that if i didnt accept her having at least one fling every three months, then I was to blame for this because I didnt accept her freedoms and liberties and "her needs". I find it really manipulative that she could behave in this way. At first I thought it was here and ridiculous to generalize about all Afrikaner women but I spoke to members of her family and said that this type of flirtatious/promiscuous behaviour is quite common place in Afrikaner society. The "dutch ancestory" is highly free spirited. Not that there is anything wrong with being a free spirit but in Australia we have boundaries, especially when it comes to marriage. I then told her that this type of flirtatious behaviour would need to stop if I was to marry her. She then threw a chair at me and got very aggressive telling me that I had "lied" to her about my will to be with her for the rest of her life and she then took that as an open ticket to have sex with my friends. I cant believe that she could turn out to be so callous. She had no conscious for my feelings whatsoever. i say this in all sincerity and I do not wish to "demonize" Afrikaners in any way. Her family and her confirmed my greatest fears. Just like my sister told me - " she will be a hard one to keep" because she even flirted with my sister's husband! I am sure there are some really good afrikaners out there and I dont intend to generalize however from my time with her i got to realize the STARK DIFFERENCES between Aussies and Afrikaners (dutch descent Afrikaners). It has made me really interested in Afrikaner culture, not out of spite but to educate myself further as to why women in Dutch Afrikaner society behave in this flirtatious manner. Did they have it too good under Apartheid? Did they have an overly heightened sense of entitlement? Can anyone please give me some suggestions or information to further explore this subject so i can move on and get to understand the situation better? Cheers, Craig.
Rating: 4 / 5
 
by Craig on 21 Jun 2014

 
Craig why were you so gullable? Of course Afrikaner women are free spirited. We lived in a democracy after all. But why are you labelling Afrikaner women as sluts essentially? they dont sleep around unless the man treats them right. I dont know why you are painting them all with the same brush, You had a bad experience with one particular Afrikaner lady doesnt mean that they are all like that. But i do agree with you that Afrikaner women are flirts. And why shouldnt they be? They are physically beautiful, in demand, they are charming and intelligent. IF that means you have to step up and fight for her then so you should! Be a man and treat her like the princess she believes she is! No she is not entitlted as you say. She is just aware of the Afrikaner beauty that only Afrikaner girls have. They are not like black girls or Asian girls who are plentiful and of less value. They are gorgeous green and blue eyed Afrikaner girls. Girls who are in demand and treated as prized posesissions! Obviously with a name like Craig you sound like a total yobbo. She probably thought she was better than you. Treat it as a bad experience, cut your losses and move on.
Rating: 2 / 5
 
by Henk on 21 Jun 2014

 
@Greg I think your view is a bit narrow minded to be honest. You keep talking about white privilege and you make it seem like white people do not realize how privileged they are which in South Africa is quite ridiculous. We know how privileged we are and we know that other people are not as privileged but that does not makes us racist. I was born in 1995 after Apartheid and yes I cannot use that as an excuse to say it means I am not racist but I really am not. The fact of the matter is. Yes, Jan Van Riebeeck and Co. came to the Cape so many years back and found some people who did not have a common language and did not necessarily understand the worth of things he had to offer so these people started to use their natural advantage. Circumstantially this led to Apartheid. And no, I am not justifying Apartheid but these are the things that led to Apartheid becoming what it was. Now so many years later there are a lot of black people in the majority that have been disadvantaged but there is also so much us white "privileged" people can do. We are also trying to survive. We also want good lives for ourselves. We are being negatively affected by BEE. Hey. Even black people are being negatively affected by BEE. This is because it is being run so badly that a minority is exploiting it. A minority of black people. Call that racist to their own people if you want but circumstantially they have the ability to exploit it. I don't think the problem really us with the mindsets of white people in particular. I think it is the entire country. White people think of Malema as the idea of a black person and black people think of the racist supremist as the white person. A similar idea shared by some Indian people, etc. Now you know what I call racism at its finest in South Africa. The DA for example will come up with a brilliant idea to create new jobs and run BEE differently but when I ask black/indian people why they do not vote for the DA. Their responses are not based on policies, ideas, fact or previous experience. What do they say. I don't trust the DA. Why not? They are a white party and they might start Apartheid all over again. Not to mention the fact that people just can't get over this whole white privilege idea. Okay the world sucks and some people really have it tough but not one is really going to make you earn enough money to be happy with political BS. You need to get up and do something about it. I was speaking to this guy that we employ today. He is an illegal immigrant from Zimbabwe but he is a hell of a nice guy and I love chatting to him. He saves money even though he doesn't make much. He plans on moving back to Zimbabwe and starting a business when he has R300 000 . His aunt did the same and now she has moved her business that has grown to he UK and she has created a good life for herself. Unfortunately he says that he can't stay in SA if he does that because the people he grew up with will be jealous and try to kill him. These are people I have hope for. He doesn't sit and complain about his situation. He is trying to do something about it. If everyone had that mindset in South Africa then racism wouldn't really be an important topic because it would make much of a difference. Well, it doesn't anyway...
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by Stephan Casey on 17 Jun 2014

 
After six years in marriage with my husband with 3 kids, he suddenly started going out with other women and coming home late, each time i confronted him it turns out to be a fight and he always threatened to divorce me at all time, my marriage was gradually coming to an end. i tried all i could to stop him from this unruly attitude but all proved abortive, until i saw a post in the forum about a spell caster who helps people cast spell on marriage and relationship problems, at first i doubted it but decided to give it a try, when i contacted this Spell caster Dr. ZAKI via email, he helped me cast a spell and within 4 hours my husband came back apologizing for all he has done and promised never to do such again and today we are happily together again. Contact this Great spell caster for your marriage or relationship issues via this email; dr.zakispellhome@gmail.com
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by christina perez on 15 Jun 2014

 
I salute in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ Amen. I am a Nigeria,I base in South Africa as a Refugee for a year plus now. I love South Africa , and I hard a South Africa families here. But , I wanna leave South Africa to Australia due to discrimination about Nigeria issues , most South Africans always feels that all Nigeria are Drugs dealers and fraud stars. I most confess this has been on and I don't wanna regret been a Nigeria so I decided to leave South Africa for personal reason I experience in Soweto, I once staying in South Africa due to I could not pay my House rent in Town,so I relocated to South Africa , after a few month they started fighting me and accusing me of Drugs dealing, I most confess if none that I quickly rough to the police station and they now followed me to my House and settle the issues with my Land Lord and His friends who where fighting me , and the police now advices me to pack out within few days to avoid them wish I actually moved out. I am a Nigeria but I don't smoke anything smoking and I don't drink Alcohol and I don't have any criminal record here in South Africa,I am a born again Christian and I respect the law of the Land as God command us in His words to respect the Authority. I will be glad if given me assistance to travel to South Africa. Thanking you for your anticipation. God bless Australia.
Rating: 1 / 5
 
by okoh on 09 Jun 2014

 
A comprehensive guide to white privilege in South Africa 1. White privilege, like whiteness itself, is almost indefinable to white people. There are few words to describe the invisible. However, white privilege is only invisible to white people and to those people of colour/black people who benefit and buy into white privilege. 2. Many whites in South Africa are generally unwilling to engage in the topic of racism – most crying out that we “must move beyond race’ and that they “do not see colour”. This is the new phenomenon of “colourblind racism” that denies and ignores the fact that for people of colour/black people, race still matters because they still experience it. This is because colourblind white people still practice racism. 3. These white folk will make blanket statements like “we don’t have apartheid anymore” or “there’s a black president now” or, even worse, “all of that stuff happened so long ago and now there is BEE which has made us the victims of black racism or black supremacy”. But 20 years is not that long ago and it will take decades for the pain and destruction of our history to subside. 4. Because of the transitional system of reconciliation, which seemed only to benefit white folk – coupled with the implementation of a business-biased macroeconomic policy – whites have continued to benefit hugely from the system. Economic studies have shown that many whites have in fact grown richer in the past 20 years – while the majority of blacks and smaller pockets of whites and minority groups have just grown poorer. 5. Yes, there is a burgeoning black middle class and many white people will often use this to point out that blacks are taking over and “stealing” their opportunities. This sense of ownership over opportunities is a sure sign of white privilege. 6. White privilege means not recognising that there is no such thing as Black Supremacy as black folk have not occupied and oppressed the world under a dominant ideology of Blackness. 7. There were also no “benefits” to black people under the colonial and apartheid rule, though some whites will argue that whites “brought civilisation to Africa for the blacks”. They did not. They built “civilisation” on the backs of black slavery, for themselves, and were just recently forced to share the spoils of their exploitative history with the indigenous people of this land. 8. This is because black people fought a long and hard struggle to overturn a system from which they received no benefits. White privilege means you do not make the connection between the struggle and a system of historically racialised oppression. 9. Whenever “diversity” or “race” comes up as a way to create opportunities for the previously disadvantaged, some indignant white person is sure to say, “Race shouldn’t matter as much as merit. I don’t think people should be judged on the colour of their skin. Everyone should be judged regardless of their colour.” So why then do white people continue to judge black people according to their skin colour? Why does critique of blackness by the white regime always centre on their morphology, their blackness, ‘their culture‘, ‘their penis‘, ‘their bad use of English‘ among other things? This message is implicit and sometimes explicit in white critique of blackness, whether in news reportage, art, satire, cartoons or columns. 10. The default here is that white people have more merit and capability and are therefore more deserving of opportunities. 11. White privilege is accusing people of drawing the race card when whites are critiqued for being racist and then saying skin colour has got nothing to do with it. 12. It is true race isn’t theoretically about skin color. Race is a systemic, governmental, juridical set of processes rooted firmly in an exploitative history that have entrenched racial inequalities. So, for instance, race isn’t that I’m white and you’re black. Race is a set of laws that are entrenched to favour whiteness and that most often vicitimise black folk. 13. Race is the law that becomes apartheid and is then replaced by neo-colonialism. Race is the common stereotype that if a black family moves into a neighborhood, property values go down and noise levels go up, or when too many black kids move into a private or public school it soon sees whites leaving the school. Race is shooting 44 striking black men dead because black working class bodies still have very little value in a white dominated system and many white people will think and say that they deserved it. Race is the common white assumption that all black people are lazy even though between 4am and 7am, the streets are filled with black folk making their way to badly paid jobs in white areas because they work hard to survive and feed and clothe their families. 14. White privilege is reflected the second a person asks why we are still talking about race. 15. These people act offended, angered and annoyed if another person calls out and interrogates their whiteness/white privilege. They feel that talking about whiteness is reverse discrimination. They accuse white people who interrogate whiteness of being mad and ‘other’ them in dehumanising terms. 16. White privilege is accusing a black person who critiques whiteness of being racist. 17. White privilege is asking your badly paid maid to unpack your daily clothes-buying splurges in which you spend more in one day than you pay her for the month. 18. White privilege is asserting on a public platform that a white woman learning to Twerk is some sort of nation building exercise. 19. There are 56 million people in South Africa. 50% of those people live below the breadline – the majority of poor people are black. This means they are trapped in a system that favours whiteness and white business at the expense of the poor. Many white people will blame this entirely on the government and while government must be critiqued for failing to adequately change the system and deliver to the poor, white people refuse to see the role of white greed and corporate power in this systemically skewed and racialised economy. 20. White privilege is investing in red rhino horns and demonising impoverished black poachers whilst never once considering marching against hunger or pointing their fingers at those at the top of the value chain in poaching, which is, sometimes, a white game farm owner. 21. “I don’t see race” or “We should all just look past race” are two general statements that can only be said by a person for whom race is not a daily struggle. 22. White privilege is entrenched narcissism because it is the ability to continuously demand images of whiteness in all representational media and transformation processes and using black representation to further their ’causes’ only when it suits them. If white people are not in charge of transformation processes, which has become a white industry, they cry racism. 23. If black organisations spring up to take charge of their own representation and transformation white people will use sympathetic media to make a huge hullaballoo about the exclusion of whiteness and label it racism instead of seeing it as self-determination. This has ensured that the means-of-production has mostly remained in the hands of white business and has created another industry from which whites can benefit – the constant training of black people. 24. White privilege is being able to endlessly exploit black body for financial gains and pat themselves on their backs for doing “good and beneficial” work. 25. White privilege is the irrational fear that affirmative action programs are going to open the way for blacks to take over, or more specifically to take “my position” at university or in the workplace. White privilege is the assumption that the “position” is yours to begin with. 26. In South Africa black people have also often been overlooked for ‘coloured or Indian’ people for leadership positions in institutions of learning. This is because white people perceive minorities as less threatening and have more inherent trust in those who are not ‘fully black’. It is a deeply entrenched prejudice towards blackness that has been cultivated and passed down from generation to generation over the past four centuries. 27. White privilege is not noticing that in a country that is majority black and has a black government, the amount of black teachers and lecturers in schools, colleges and universities is not representative of the country’s demographics. Neither is the number of black Directors of NGOs in civil society, or owners of film companies and media outlets. The corporate world remains largely untransformed too. 28. White privilege is blaming this on perceived black incompetence rather that seeing how the system is designed to provide opportunities for white people, then Indian and coloured people, and lastly black people, excluding the small black elite and elements of burgeoning black middle class. This is the racialised hierarchy of privilege entrenched in the apartheid system and still in place today. White privilege is accepting this status quo to preserve white benefit and ignoring the negative impact it has on the next generation. 29. White privilege is also blaming the poor for their poverty instead of looking at systemic issues that create poverty. 30. White privilege means never having your intelligence or integrity questioned. It means not having to work that much harder just to safeguard yourself from deleterious critique when you achieve prominence. It means never having to second-guess yourself about your competence or being sideswiped by disparaging comment by white people who are shaken by your success. It means not automatically being suspected of being open to corruption. It means not being racially profiled as the rapist, the tsotsi, the hijacker and the monster in the shadows, simply because you are black and male. It means that if you are raped you are more likely to see justice. 31. A white person doesn’t think of himself or herself as white. “We are just people” is the common mantra. White people very quickly revert to being white when they need to differentiate themselves from perceived “bad behaviours” of “these people” though. 32. When we talk about white privilege, we’re not only talking about healthy bank accounts and elite status. That’s where class comes in and we all know there is a small elite class of black and minority groups in South Africa (onto whom many whites project all elements of corruption and unfair power acquisition as they somehow think blacks do not deserve to be rich). But we are talking about a set of non-tangible advantages, like never being told that we speak well. No one has ever told me that I speak well because I’m white. It means never having someone walk towards you with a face-cracking smile that seeks to prove that this white person is okay with black folk and is inwardly congratulating herself for her magnanimous and non-racial attitudes. It means never being spoken to in broken stilted English in a fake African accent. 33. White privilege is knowing that the stuff you are taught at schools and universities is largely centred on your culture and value system. 34. White privilege is appropriating aspects of black culture in carnivalesque situations such as Rag or Halloween or as some kind of fun but at the end of the day, when it’s all said and done, returning to whiteness with no inkling of the experience of living black. 35. White privilege is claiming you are “African” and into “Ubuntu” but doing and saying nothing about the inequalities you see around you, thus maintaining your white privilege while assuming commonality and brotherhood with those exploited by the system of which you are a beneficiary. 36. It means co-opting and appropriating black words to push your own business while not fully understanding or practicing the meaning of the indigenous knowledge that you colonise with little reflection on the privileged act of stealing from black awareness. 37. White privilege is thinking it is normal to say you are not racist because you have no problem with “these people”. 38. White privilege is not knowing that while not all white people are racist, all white people have white privilege – even in a country that is African – because we belong to and are privileged by a ‘white regime’ that is global and not just a local neo-colonial phenomenon. 39. Recognising you have white privilege is part of the fight against racism. You cannot fight a system if you do not recognise how it has benefitted you as a white person. While I have never really been economically privileged, with a single-mother household for most of my childhood, I know I have white privilege and that definitely impacts how I relate to the world and shapes how I choose to live in the world. When you understand your own white privilege, you are better equipped to see and understand systemic discrimination and inequality and begin to deconstruct it from within. It is hard to imagine being anti-racist without being anti-imperialst and anti-neoliberal as these are the very systems that perpetuate inequality and racism globally. 40. I am sure there are many more examples of white privilege and I invite readers to please add to this list by sending me your examples of white privilege
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by Greg on 16 Jan 2014

 
Edy, what a load of unudalterated nonsense...clearly your reasoning is shocking in addition to you being clearly a racist...Firstly you state it is ok to go overseas for better opportunities but that going away from crime is not, you then harp on about how white Saouth Africans need to stay and work along with fellow South Africans, which seems contrary to your first comment. Do you even think before you type? More of a response you do not deserve.
Rating: 4 / 5
 
by Jakkie on 08 Jan 2014

 
Going to other countries especially Austrialia for good life and good opportunities is ok and acceptable. but using excuses such as crimes from Black south Africans, Usafe and so many nonses is unfair. During the apertheid, the white were governing SA and white people had an easy life they got evrything they wanted easily while black south African worked very hard and tirelessly to get equally the same thing , or not even getting ..black parents worked hard to educate the kids while our white folks found life easy ..the black folks continued working hard and the few who succeeded during that time was bcos of hard work ...Now that the government has changes, every one has an equal opportunity, intensive competition both at work and business rising . making everything difficult to get than it used to be, the white folks are now using crime as an excuse to leave and black mail Black south Africans so that they find hard time if they are to go Australia ..why dont u stay and work hard to earn a leaving. the black south Africans did that during Aperthied!! they worked hard ..do the same.. work hard ..i can assure u that even in the so called developed countries time will come when everyone will be forced to work hard and earn a leaving , stop being cowards running away looking for easy life ..
Rating: 3 / 5
 
by edy on 17 Dec 2013

 
We live a privileged life in SA, received our visa for Oz in October and plan on moving in April 2014 with my wife and 2 young daughters. SA is a beautiful country however many things need to go right for this country to provide our kids with the opportunity for a free and fair life. Both countries have pros and cons. Having lived in Oz previously for the longer term our decision has been to relocate to Oz. While we leave behind a reasonable standard of living in Oz we hope for a better quality of life.
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by John on 11 Dec 2013

 
Petra Playfair, the managing partner of Playfair Visa and Migration Services, one of Australia's long-standing, highly regarded migration firms, will be holding seminars in Johannesburg and Cape Town in the last weeks of January 2014. If you would like to register to attend one of Petra' seminar, please visit our website and submit an enquiry form.
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by Playfair Visa and Migration Services on 05 Dec 2013

 
I'm so shocked that everybody think its all abot racism. Even the south africans! Its NOT! It's about our children (black/white/coulerd) not having a future with South African education. It SUCKS! It's about safety for all races not being able to go and take a walk with our children to any park or shop. I know that Aus people believe that we want to come over and take their jobs ect. We don't! We believe that you have a great country (that's why so many choose you!) To raise a family and to live in peace. We are not allowed this in SA! Please don't blame me for what my great grandfather/mother did! I'm an individual person, understanding that coulor is not the meaning of who and what you are! I have friends of all races! Its your inside that reflects what I see in you!
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by yolande on 20 Nov 2013

 
I am a white female south african. I am hoping to immigrate next year to Australia. I have read so many stories, and it baffles me that Australians feel we are a racist nation. They clearly need to experience life in SA for themselves. The crime statistics are RIDICULOUS, this past month I have read in the news of 2 children aged 4 months and 3 years who were raped and killed in a township not far from a major city, children who were eaten by RATS because of their parents abandoning them becos they are out on a role to find drugs. My uncle owns a bottle store that has been robbed 8 times this year, he doesnt even have insurance anymore because companies refuse to insure him. The amount of south african's being hi-jacked by the POLICE!!! The same police that are supposed to "protect" are the one's soing the hi-jacks in full police uniform and vehicles. It is sad to sad most of these culprits are black, this statement does NOT make me a racist. Chantel.. you are worried about people arriving on boats - well at least the goverment helps them, unlike SA we allow illegal immigrants to come in and rape, murder, hi-jack ect like we dont have enough to deal with our own people. At least Australian goverment doesnt give them reason to come in and rape your families and rob and murder. Chantel, maybe you should do your SA research, because nowadays your children are not even safe even if they are in PRIVATE SCHOOLS. I want a better life for my children i dont want them to live how i lived growing up where i couldnt even ride my bicycle on the road, where i would break out in a sweat if i heard the dogs bark at night. I have been a victim of crime, and it is not nice, it changes you for life. I will never drive at night without looking from left to right and making sure my foot is ready on accelerator in case i need to flea, i will never trust any police officer because most of them all are corrupt and make cases disappear allowing these criminals to continue running freely. South Africa is an utter disgrace, it is going no where, there is no future or hope.
Rating: 2 / 5
 
by Cristal on 16 Nov 2013

 
ha
Rating: 1 / 5
 
by john on 07 Nov 2013

 
I'm shocked to learn that Australians believe that most white South Africans are still racist!? I do believe that in every country racism is an issue. There are however white South Africans that are not but are perceived to be simply because we are looking for better opportunities elsewhere. I am a 35 year old white male married to a 33 year old white female and have a daughter aged 8 and a son aged 5. I have received sponsorship to live and work in Adelaide on a 457 visa. We are now just waiting on our visa's to be approved to relocate. The reason for my relocation is simple, a better life for my children! If I found this in Kenya, Nigeria or Dubai, this is where I would go. I will stop at nothing to offer them the opportunities that I never had. But you're a white South African? Surely you enjoyed a life of absolute luxury living in SA during Apartheid? No. contrary to popular belief, it was only a handful of whites that benefited from this, Government and their friends and family! My parents were normal working class people. My family was poor, living in Hillbrow in a small 2 bedroom apartment. Parents were eventually divorced, My father shot himself and my mother remarried a man that sexually abused my sisters and physically abused me. We were eventually removed by welfare and placed into foster care. My older sister became a crack addict with, God alone knows, how many children, My younger sister is a single mother living in a one bedroom cottage with her 11 year old daughter whos father abandoned then when she was born. I ran away from home at the age of 15 and lived on the street for 2 weeks before I was taken in by an Afrikaans gent who felt sorry for a kid on the street(he was racist through and through) I eventually left there once I started working to get closer to my place of employment. I was offered residence with a Black, Zulu family where I stayed for 3 years. I worked hard as I did not have an education and soon I was managing branches of various companies. I met a beautiful woman who went on to get a degree, we got married, had 2 wonderful children & enjoyed a reasonably comfortable lifestyle. 2 years ago, my wife was retrenched due to the economic climate. She was forced to take a job that offered a third her salary. I was then transferred from Durban to Joburg and 4 months later my company was liquidated. 2 months later my wife's new company closed their doors as well. I have more than 18 years experience. My wife has a degree and about 13 years experience and we are unable to find employment. I was told that a white male is at the bottom of the list when it come to employment and literally when one completes an application for employment this is exactly the order, Black, Coloured, Indian... white. We are simply being ostracized! Its reverse Apartheid without the name and the world can point fingers saying we deserve it because of what happened in the past!? Screw that, I had nothing to do with Apartheid, I was just a child, My parents did not even vote cause we had plenty black friends and we were not happy with the situation but too poor and insignificant to do anything about it. Now because I'm not happy living in these conditions, I'm appalled by the fact that babys are being raped and killed because traditional(black) healers say that this cures AIDS, children are killing each other at schools, teachers are beaten by children, police are shooting innocent people, murders daily, car jacking's daily, AIDS that the president of the country believes can be prevented by taking a shower after intercourse, the health minister that believes AIDS can be cured by beetroot..., now I'm racist, come on people!? I have absolutely no issues with any people of any race, gender or back round. When I discuss issues in the bar over a pint or two and the perp turns out to be black, its not racism, it just happens to be the truth. I believe Australia has its problems. I believe that if we want to find something to complain about, we will but I also believe that Australia offers equal opportunity for all. I believe that I can contribute in many ways which I'm not allowed to do here in SA. I will move to Australia. I will make it work and I pray that one day my family will be accepted as a normal God fearing people and perhaps even as Australians. God bless us all!
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by Roger on 06 Nov 2013

 
I'm shocked to learn that Australians believe that most white South Africans are still racist!? I do believe that in every country racism is an issue. There are however white South Africans that are not but are perceived to be simply because we are looking for better opportunities elsewhere. I am a 35 year old white male married to a 33 year old white female and have a daughter aged 8 and a son aged 5. I have received sponsorship to live and work in Adelaide on a 457 visa. We are now just waiting on our visa's to be approved to relocate. The reason for my relocation is simple, a better life for my children! If I found this in Kenya, Nigeria or Dubai, this is where I would go. I will stop at nothing to offer them the opportunities that I never had. But you're a white South African? Surely you enjoyed a life of absolute luxury living in SA during Apartheid? No. contrary to popular belief, it was only a handful of whites that benefited from this, Government and their friends and family! My parents were normal working class people. My family was poor, living in Hillbrow in a small 2 bedroom apartment. Parents were eventually divorced, My father shot himself and my mother remarried a man that sexually abused my sisters and physically abused me. We were eventually removed by welfare and placed into foster care. My older sister became a crack addict with, God alone knows, how many children, My younger sister is a single mother living in a one bedroom cottage with her 11 year old daughter whos father abandoned then when she was born. I ran away from home at the age of 15 and lived on the street for 2 weeks before I was taken in by an Afrikaans gent who felt sorry for a kid on the street(he was racist through and through) I eventually left there once I started working to get closer to my place of employment. I was offered residence with a Black, Zulu family where I stayed for 3 years. I worked hard as I did not have an education and soon I was managing branches of various companies. I met a beautiful woman who went on to get a degree, we got married, had 2 wonderful children & enjoyed a reasonably comfortable lifestyle. 2 years ago, my wife was retrenched due to the economic climate. She was forced to take a job that offered a third her salary. I was then transferred from Durban to Joburg and 4 months later my company was liquidated. 2 months later my wife's new company closed their doors as well. I have more than 18 years experience. My wife has a degree and about 13 years experience and we are unable to find employment. I was told that a white male is at the bottom of the list when it come to employment and literally when one completes an application for employment this is exactly the order, Black, Coloured, Indian... white. We are simply being ostracized! Its reverse Apartheid without the name and the world can point fingers saying we deserve it because of what happened in the past!? Screw that, I had nothing to do with Apartheid, I was just a child, My parents did not even vote cause we had plenty black friends and we were not happy with the situation but too poor and insignificant to do anything about it. Now because I'm not happy living in these conditions, I'm appalled by the fact that babys are being raped and killed because traditional(black) healers say that this cures AIDS, children are killing each other at schools, teachers are beaten by children, police are shooting innocent people, murders daily, car jacking's daily, AIDS that the president of the country believes can be prevented by taking a shower after intercourse, the health minister that believes AIDS can be cured by beetroot..., now I'm racist, come on people!? I have absolutely no issues with any people of any race, gender or back round. When I discuss issues in the bar over a pint or two and the perp turns out to be black, its not racism, it just happens to be the truth. I believe Australia has its problems. I believe that if we want to find something to complain about, we will but I also believe that Australia offers equal opportunity for all. I believe that I can contribute in many ways which I'm not allowed to do here in SA. I will move to Australia. I will make it work and I pray that one day my family will be accepted as a normal God fearing people and perhaps even as Australians. God bless us all!
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by Roger on 06 Nov 2013

 
Hello fellow South Africans I migrated at the beginning of this year from South Africa to Perth. We lived in Perth for 7 months and have now moved to Melbourne because of work. Melbourne is a stunning city with tons to offer but the weather is horrible. Although we are busy exploring the wonders of Melbourne we are terribly home sick, missing family,friends and the comforts of home. Any advise for new comers on how to make friends?
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by Geetha on 24 Oct 2013

 
We arrived in Adelaide 13 years ago to seek a better life. We are a white family who previously lived privileged lives in RSA, having a cleaner and gardener. In 2000 South Africa had so much negative energy and the issues that dominated society included racial privilege/disadvantage, proverty and a struggle to survive, lowering educational and safety standards. Despite many good things happening there at the time it was not a society in which I wanted to raise my young kids. Most South Africans appeared to become quite materially obesessed, seeking security in their possessions. People were increasingly judged on what car they drove or where they lived. Racial categorisation were being slowly being replaced with stark economic divisions. People were becoming extravagantly rich or remaining dirt poor. The scale of poverty was overwhelming and still presents a threat to the stability of their country. It became increasingly difficult to understand whether taxes actually uplifted the poor masses or rather benefitted a very opulent ruling elite. The number of Mercedes and BMW cars on the freeways in Johannesburg defy logic. Our lives in RSA became more and more unnatural. Walking at sunset in the neigbourhood became dangerous. Sleeping with open windows (despite burglar bars)on hot summer nights became a high risk. Dining at a restaurant at night only happened if there was secure parking and security gates at the door. Car doors were locked 24/7. Most carried a huge bunch of keys to keep everything locked, many had guns, stunning devices or pepper spray as personal safety measures, etc. You locked your back door when hanging up the washing! South Africa became mall obsessed, because it was some of the few places where they could still move around in relative safety. This phenomenenon killed the hearts of cities and towns, that became dilapidated and filthy - a vicious cicle. All that was left were a series of malls and themed casino complexes to express the little freedom that remained. And gated communities to create a semblance of normality in suburbia. The ridiculousness of the lifestyle in South Africa forced a rethink. There must be a better life to live. Australia is not a paradise but gives its citizens a normal society to live in. Its cities are among the most livable in the world. Adelaide scores seond highest in Australia on this front. Australia is a privileged country and restored our faith in government and societal structures. It just works. You know where your taxes go. There are laws and they are enforced. You are given an opportunity to pursue your dreams here. Australia is the land of opportunity and we have embraced it. It owed us nothing and still took us in. Therefore we contribute to our migrant and local community though volunteer work. Australia deserves nothing less. Like any migrant South Africans come with their few suitcases of preconceptions and history. This does not mean that they do not assimilate well. South African migrants are diverse and hold a diversity of views. They are not better nor worse than other migrant communities that come into Australia. Generally, they assimilate into mainstream society, and I have noticed many who have changed their preconceptions. I do not wish to live in South Africa and Australia is my home. for my children, missing out on extended family is the price we have to pay (and continue paying). However this will normalise as soon as the third generation appears.
Rating: 4 / 5
 
by Harry on 27 Sep 2013

 
I have met a few South Africans like Helen. Their racist views aren't welcome in Australia. Many seem to have a gun mentality and I have actually heard a South African looking at a happy family at a beach in Queensland and saying the beach was clean except for them being there.
Rating: 1 / 5
 
by momo on 09 Sep 2013

 
I have had the good fortune to work in 2 African countries for 5 years alongside many white South Africans. During that time I got to know some of them very well, both of the "Afrikaans and English" South Africans". On the surface South Africans share a lot in common with Australians, we both like beer, fast cars, BBQs, have the same dry sense of humour, and enjoy cricket to mention a few. However after a while to get to know them, and perhaps a few beers for them to drop their guard, their true feeling comes out about how they feel pushed out of their own country and culture. You only have to wait for a drunken round of De la Rey and challenge them that the song is not about a Boer war general, but how they want things to return back to the way it used to be, that you can judge by their silence, and umms, and errs, that follow, that the feeling that white South Africans have for blacks still runs very deep. This is of course comes from the white South Africans living and working on the African continent and yet to visit or migrate to Australia. Now as myself being an original white Australian living in Australia, and being having past experiences working with South Africans both in Africa and Australia, I can assure you that the racist sentiment South Africans have, have never left their spirit even in their migration to Australian shores. I have personally experienced (in Austalia) being held back on my career by SA's in management positions, prefering to look after their own kind. But not just myself on 2 occassions, but my sister on 1 occasion too. Since then I have remarried to a non-African black professional (medical) woman that has had her career cut short on 2 occassions by a South African, and further, other coloured migrants in the same profession also have had their jobs cut or redundant by the same South African, whereas other white migrants prosper. The long and short of it is; white South Africans migrating to Australia, come here because it is a white country, and they believe it is a way of winding back the past, whatching the cricket, singing another round of De la Rey, and call Australia their South African home. Multiculturism has made Australia a better place, and Australians are way too tolerant (re: boat people), but we accept that multiculturalism enriches the our way of life. However the resentment that white South Africans still have against coloured people of all races, is not welcomed here. If you cant let go, then you are not welcome.
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by Neil on 14 Jul 2013

 
We are a family of 5 living in Aus and enjoying and apreciating the freedom of safety. No more alarms, walls, double lock ups. Left SA in 2002. Our childrens home is here. We have great jobs, live in a beautiful area... We are Australian citizens.Only 3 generations back and 60 years ago did my granny arrive on a farm in South Africa, leaving England.We have 50 years later left. Personally that feeling of displacement never leaves me. I am also deeply sad not to be a part of my larger familes daily lives. I still have to "let go". A move back to SA would be as unsuccsessfull as up rooting a fully grown tree.
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by Jen Rees on 15 Jun 2013

 
I am afraid that South Africans in Australia are here largely because they are racist and want to live in a country governed by whites. While the white apartheid government still provided segregated facilities they were happy to live in Africa. Now that the going is tough, they could not wait to get going! Of course they will say they ran because of the crime and it being unsafe "for a white man" to remain in South Africa. I have just one question for them: if it is so unsafe why did you leave your aged defenceless parents and other members of your families behind to be devoured by the "forces of darkness"? How cowardly is that? Its about time that the immigrants be honest - they moved for better opportunities; better lifestyles etc. (and there is nothing wrong with that so stop making false excuses people) and, mostly, because they hate black people.
Rating: 4 / 5
 
by andre landman on 11 Jun 2013

 
Australia is a first world country. All continents - including South America - are growing at an astonishing rates - except Africa. The reason - political and social instability and distrust of African governments. Nobody wants to invest substatially in Africa. Compare FDI figures of Japan, the USA, Australia, Canada and Germany in asian and South American countries and then compare percentage wise how much is invested in Africa - then you will know what I mean. The USA is not dominating the economic scene anymore, but still forms a big part of it. Asia (China) is Australia's main business partner an is situated right on our doorstep. Crime is minimal and lesser autrocities in the comunity is often blown out of proportion, because of lack of other more serious matters to report on. With this being said: Australia is light years ahead of South Africa with regards to remuneration packages, social development, availability of work (especially skilled work) and there is no social discrimination. If you are willing to work - Australia is your country. Labour earn far in eccess than what you will ever earn in RSA. Here is a lot of rules to observe, but very littly beaurocracy. If you are competent to do your own migration applications - fill in forms ect.- the whole emigration process will cost you +/- AUD $10000.00. Don't dispair. You only need a 457visa or PR visa to enter Australia and work. You can start the applications and obtaining the visas in RSA. The rest you can do in Australia - once you are here. The majority of South Africans that return to RSA do so bacause of family issues and inability to retain visa required obligations if a job is lost. There are very few that return. Personally, Australia has been an absolute dream come true for me. I have migrated as a skilled person and there is no ways that I will ever return to RSA. I am here 4 & 1/2 years now. I remember my family and friends and visit them every year, but for the rest - I have forgotten RSA. I am not going to elaborate against all RSA's other woes. It is not necessary - others will do that for me, but let me say this: If you first experience a first world country you will realize how bad RSA has become. If you see the quality and beauty of public buildings and the advanced infrastructure of the cities you will realize that RSA at this moment really has very little to offer or that can compare.
Rating: 3 / 5
 
by M Muller on 07 May 2013

 
Australia is a first world country. All continents - including South America - are growing at an astonishing rates - except Africa. The reason - political and social instability and distrust of African governments. Nobody wants to invest substatially in Africa. Compare FDI figures of Japan, the USA, Australia, Canada and Germany in asian and South American countries and then compare percentage wise how much is invested in Africa - then you will know what I mean. The USA is not dominating the economic scene anymore, but still forms a big part of it. Asia (China) is Australia's main business partner an is situated right on our doorstep. Crime is minimal and lesser autrocities in the comunity is often blown out of proportion, because of lack of other more serious matters to report on. With this being said: Australia is light years ahead of South Africa with regards to remuneration packages, social development, availability of work (especially skilled work) and there is no social discrimination. If you are willing to work - Australia is your country. Labour earn far in eccess than what you will ever earn in RSA. Here is a lot of rules to observe, but very littly beaurocracy. If you are competent to do your own migration applications - fill in forms ect.- the whole emigration process will cost you +/- AUD $10000.00. Don't dispair. You only need a 457visa or PR visa to enter Australia and work. You can start the applications and obtaining the visas in RSA. The rest you can do in Australia - once you are here. The majority of South Africans that return to RSA do so bacause of family issues and inability to retain visa required obligations if a job is lost. There are very few that return. Personally, Australia has been an absolute dream come true for me. I have migrated as a skilled person and there is no ways that I will ever return to RSA. I am here 4 & 1/2 years now. I remember my family and friends and visit them every year, but for the rest - I have forgotten RSA. I am not going to elaborate against all RSA's other woes. It is not necessary - others will do that for me, but let me say this: If you first experience a first world country you will realize how bad RSA has become. If you see the quality and beauty of public buildings and the advanced infrastructure of the cities you will realize that RSA at this moment really has very little to offer or that can compare.
Rating: 3 / 5
 
by M Muller on 07 May 2013

 
I moved to Australia in 2008. There are a few things I keep in mind. This is a country which I decided to adopt. Australia have rules,regulations and laws which I have to obey. I had a few issues with my accent which I am not going to change. I tried very hard as a grade 1 student to say (rrrrrrrrr) My husband is a Textile coater/ dyer and finisher. He was sponsored a 457 Visa. We became permanant residents in 2010. His sponsored company went through some tough times, people were retrenched and he was on shortime for two years but we persevered. Eventualy he started working for 15 min per day and had no work for the rest of the day. That was when we said he should look for another job. He applied for two in Melbourne and both accepted him. He has been working for this company for 18 months and have been offered jobs on a regular basis. His attitude towards his staff job and clients draws people to him and it has nothing to do with culture or race. We miss our friends and family but every few years we buy a plane ticket and go visit South Africa.
Rating: 4 / 5
 
by Colleen Joseph on 17 Apr 2013

 
Sydney
Rating: 3 / 5
 
by Helen on 19 Mar 2013

 
Hi we came to AU in 2009 my husband was employed as a skilled migrant on a 457 visa, we were promised Permanent residence after two years being employed with the company. Unfortunately he was made REDUNDANT. He battled to get a new sponsored company. We then got hold of a new company and he started the new job. We were notified yesterday, they will not sponsor us for PR or extend our visa. We are not eligible to apply for PR independently as my husband is a Drill operator and his occupation is not on the list. Therefore we will be returning home in September 2013. Funny enough my husband is a skilled worker and can't get residency, Yet every morning on the news Australia welcomes the BOAT PEOPLE in and supply them with housing, living expenses. Therefore I will not advice the South Africans to immigrate. You think our Country is bad, just wait and see, with all the boat people coming just wait and see how long this country will stay good! ADVISE TO SOUTH AFRICANS WANTING TO IMMIGRATE: Make sure you have done all your home work about AU before you get on the plane.
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by chantel on 15 Jan 2013

 
I live in Mandurah, Western Australia
Rating: 4 / 5
 
by Marian on 21 Nov 2012

 
I live in Mandurah, Western Australia and have been here for 5 wonderful years - Not a day has gone by that I regret making the move over with my husband and sons. We came over to Aus in 1998 for the first time and my only regret is that we didn't stay here then. We have totally embraced this country and have never looked back - I love my adopted country and find the Australian people to be friendly and welcoming .
Rating: 4 / 5
 
by Marian on 21 Nov 2012

 
Hi Lee, Yes understand exactly what you are going through. A friend of mine was shot dead in his yard in front of his friends and family at his birthday party by 5-FIVE savages.Now to come to Australia legally is very difficult. To be in Australia as a South African is also difficult as we are not very welcome. To live here is sometimes difficult and not forgetting how expensive it is. As an international student it is extremely expensive to study here, the only plus is that when studying in Australia, you are classed as Australian educated, but then you still need Australian experience to enter the job market. South African general work experience does not count here. The U N will not help you if you are a white South African as we are racists of the highest order, does not matter what generation you are, as your parents were racists as well and their parents and so on!
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by John on 15 Nov 2012

 
In response to lee I have recently returned from South africa in particular Cape Town, a place I left at the age of 3 to migrate to Australia. My birth certificate states Cape coloured. I have family in most parts of the cape flats and returning there after being in Australia fro my whole life minus the 3 years was interesting to say the least. Many would look at me see coloured speak in afrikaans then hear the accent (Australian) and take a second puzled look that was interesting. Non the less South Africans and Australians have a good connection manly in sport and on the finding out that I was Australian rugby would be the first topic (I was raised in Melbourne, difficult) then cricket. The environment was very different to Australia I was shocked and laughed at the high fences, the alarms (with indoor sensory systems) the boom gate suburbs, security forces (Big bucks). To go out alone at night (especially in the flats) is dangerous, Australia there is a massive sense of that freedom and I have never (okay nearly never) had a problem with going out at all times of the night. I loved the food (Soul food) Gatsby's,Slap chips and hake, shnoek, (Snoek) Sun cured hell yes! Bridies, pojte's, braai's are not barbies. I especially feel at home in a town ship whether in Kwa Zulu Natal or in Grassy park (Ek se vir jou!)If it wasnt for the social/polital shite there, it would be as beautiful as the landscape.I made 30 minute documentary on it titled 'What colour is freedom' pozible.com/whatcolourisfreedom There is a podcast and trailer online. It's people like Lee I would love to talk to about your experiences. Look forward to hearing from you all spudrokk@gmail.com
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by Spencer Marc on 08 Oct 2012

 
I am a white South African who by a stroke of friendship from an Australian was helped out of South Africa on a student visa after my friend listened to the shocking trauma we underwent (over the phone) over two years. The one trauma around us noise bombardment around us particularly the increasing black population moving in who got increasingly confident in their harassment (these include guns and racial insults) because they knew that police were not responding to the calls made. The country is stricken with poverty and there is a well-established belief that whites are rich, creating a threatening environment for whites in and outside their homes as well as their work places. I personally felt this every day, when walking to work and being harassed by groups (meaning that they there is often more than one person) of black people (sometimes following me a for two blocks, until I find a shop to run into) who explicitly referred to me wealthy white who needs to "hand it over" or "give". Most of the times there was a threat given afterwards about the "consequences" if I don't "hand it over". Similarly when a bus drove past and stopped for a black person a block down, I've had comments like: "It's payback time for the whites" Similarly at my work place I have had countlessly experienced beggars ignoring my black manager while waiting for me to finish with a customer to do the same thing. In the process to organise official papers to get out of the country I experienced similar undermining in the form of misspelled names and dates on papers and then the official laughing at my anxiety and referring to my "privileged whiteness" coming to an end. My husband faced similar threats. In the critical crime state of Johannesburg (& South Africa), none of these events (if reported) would be taken in any serious light. I know this because the few crime incidences I reported when I was robbed or held up went no further than a piece of paper stating that it happened and in some cases were not even written and laughed off as not being serious enough. The response of the police, when called in various incidences were also a total absence. When applying for work during unemployment, I was told "in confidence" by my prospective employers that they cannot employ me because of B.E.E. (a black empowerment legislation). My unemployment period brought me to the verge of homelessness and me finally begging myself into some casual employment did little to keep me above the bread line .Just to mention some, I've lost friends, they have been brutally murdered, one of them being on a farm who ran a record company to promote African music, who was shot in a racial incident while his wife and child ran and locked themselves in the house waiting for the police. Another was shot in his driveway because he was a "privileged white man" who owned a car. These were murders of people I knew directly and also indirectly through friends as well as people working in businesses around me and were not just read in a newspapers. The events of robberies, threats and aggravation around me drove a conviction in me to search for a humane end to my life before it would be ended in the inhumane way so many of my friends and white South Africans met. It was at this stage that I got a life line from my Australian friend. When I arrived in Australia the full severity of my trauma came out (unintentionally) in the everyday freedom Australians enjoyed. I experienced severe anxiety attacks when approached in the very normal situation of some musos striking up a conversation outside a cafe at night before going in to perform. I experienced similar anxiety when people ran down roads in innocent chases or fun. The prospect of leaving home or going outside at night (especially when it was expected of me in my work, which is caring for disabled person) immediately put me in a state of huge fear followed by uncontrollable crying. The response I was met with was one of total disbelief and strangely the same kind of undermining I experienced in South Africa. People would laugh at me when I tried to explain my reactions and would tell me that they simply can't believe that it is that bad. Furthermore Australians believe that white South Africans enjoy great wealth and opportunity in their country and generally they are known as "whiners" and "whingers" with a bit of an arrogant personality. When exploring the options of a protection visa I came across the wider opinions of the UNHCR and Amnesty international using statistics and democracy and the same statement of white South Africans being too opinionated. The only organisation siting the situation in South Africa is Genocide watch, while other organisations like the "Afrikaner genocide archives" and Farmitracker" are whole heartedly disqualified and ignored as sensationalist. I have been discouraged to lodge anything in the form of protection by surrounding people (including South Africans) unless I have been stabbed or raped and can give clear evidence by police files etc. I think the worst response I got from a non-South African was that we must pay for 'apartheid', something I didn't condone or were of the age to condemn and during my stay in South Africa genuinely participated in empowering the disempowered with tangible projects. I am genuinely frightened to go back (if the student visa attempt fails) and I suffer with an overwhelming depression every day at the prospects of my situation and the great disbelief from the international community. I am now asking that very same community what I must do and what they would do if they were in my situation. I invite any solicitors, politicians, friends and family for any advice.
Rating: 5 / 5
 
by lee on 28 May 2012

 
Tell us what you think!
We respect your privacy! Your email address will not be published.
 
Name:*
Email:*
Details:*
Please rate this article (1 low - 5 high) 
Rating:*
Please enter the security code shown
Articles by Author
Articles by Group
Archives
 
Copyright 2009 Sabona   |   Disclaimer   |   Privacy Policy    |   Articles
Island Printing Gold Coast.        Powered by webEFEKTs.